Friday, July 31, 2009

Radio Feature

Yesterday I was a guest on the Al Sharpton show! A connection I know from the workshop in San Francisco directed me to Elinor Tatum, publisher of New Amsterdam and co-host of the show. The subject was cross-cultural adoption, and they discussed all the political issues behind domestic adoption and race--whether white people should be able to adopt black children (let's face it: black children in foster care outnumber white children by up to 10 times in some areas of this country, the reasons for this are also major problems), how should parents approach identity formation, etc. I had about 15 minutes of fame when they dialed me in. I brushed up on my statistics and facts so I could weigh into the conversation, which I'm well-versed in already, but it turns out they were more interested in my story. They were incredulous about how I went so long without even knowing my black heritage, and it reminded me how peculiar my story really is. How strong ignorance and denial are, especially when supported by your parents. How strange that social workers found it okay to lie in order to place a child in a loving home. Do the ends justify the means? I am not bitter. But it could have been done a better way.

At any rate, they sounded interested in my book--Al even said I need to call him when it comes out so he can have me back on the show--so now I'm even more motivated to get it out there! What a blessing.

6 comments:

Amy said...

Check your business out! What a great opportunity, Libby! (=

Kylie Prymus said...

When do we get a link to the show? Congrats!

missingpiece said...

very cool! wish i could have heard the show. are you writing a memoir? i love memoirs and will be very interested to read yours someday...

Erin said...

Libs, you're going to be so smokin-hot famous :) You have a story that people want to hear, and that is so exciting that you got to do this!

Please let me know if a recording of the show is accessible. I'd love to hear it!

Jessica said...

Libby, that's fantastic! If the show broadcasts your segment online, please share the link!

Rachel Stumme said...

I'm so glad your voice is being heard! And I think it makes perfect sense that you would not know your racial heritage growing up. We look to people around us as mirrors, especially our parents and "professionals." For you to identify and claim your true heritage is an act of clarity and determination...something that those of us who grew up in families of the same race never had to do. I hope that it has ultimately been an empowering experience for you.